Twenty Year Anniversary

Ecos Secure Boot Stick 5.6.5 Credential Disclosure / Information Leak

Ecos Secure Boot Stick 5.6.5 Credential Disclosure / Information Leak
Posted Jun 13, 2018
Authored by Michael Rossberg, Guenter Schaefer, Franz Girlich, Robert Lasch | Site telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de

Ecos Secure Boot Stick version 5.6.5 and System Management version 5.2.68 suffers from credential disclosure and various other security vulnerabilities that can lead to information disclosure.

tags | exploit, vulnerability, info disclosure
MD5 | 410ebe83f339489d39f169146778451a

Ecos Secure Boot Stick 5.6.5 Credential Disclosure / Information Leak

Change Mirror Download

MULTIPLE SECURITY ISSUES IN ECOS SECURE BOOT STICK (SBS)

- Software: Ecos Secure Boot Stick
- Version: Stick Version 5.6.5, System Management Version 5.2.68
- Vendor Status: Vendor informed
- Release Date: 13/06/2018

The latest version of this document may be downloaded from
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/advisory.html. A German version
may be found below.


1. General Overview

The Ecos Secure Boot Stick shall provide a secure enclave in an untrustworthy
environment, i.e. it is intended to be booted on a commodity PC and shall allow
a secure access to confidential data. The vendor states: "The ECOS SECURE BOOT
STICK (SBS) provides a highly secure access to Citrix, Microsoft Terminal
Server, VMware, View/Horizon and web applications within a protected remote
access environment."

Reference customers include German authorities, banks, insurances, and
hospitals. The numbers on the website indicate that a multiple thousand SBSes
are circulating.

During a security audit of the boot stick and its management we discovered
multiple vulnerabilities. All of them lead to SBS failing to assure the claimed
security properties, i.e. a compromised host or third party may access private
data and key material.

Disclaimer: We can neither make claims on the completeness nor the following
findings being the most significant ones. From a theoretic point of view, we
have not performed any independent thread modeling and not derived any security
requirements. Instead, we rely on the security measures and statements of the
SBS vendor as well as common sense, e.g. private keys should not be accessible.
Furthermore, we give ideas on potential mitigation measures, but we cannot make
statements about their completeness.

The novel [SE] and [SX] versions of the product were in the meantime certified
to protect VS-NfD (the German clearance level for Confidential) data by the
German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI). Although the [SE] and [SX]
versions may work similar (except for the fact of using smartcards), the
advisory may not be applicable to it. The approval of the BSI may also be tied
to certain precoditions for a secure operation, which are usually not made
public and which may mitigate risks.


2. Description of Vulnerabilities & Potential Mitigations Measures

1. Remote root login in Ecos System Management

The System Management Appliance contains root user with a set password and
enabled SSH access. The password file /etc/shadow that contains the password is
downloaded during installation of the appliance from a server operated by Ecos.
Ecos is able to provide individual passwords depending on the used license key.
Our shadow file has the following content (please note the base64 encoded
signature by Ecos):

root:$6$ys8MpGD8fzOj1CMa$8S5YZ2UasC5IVMOoshDevPYeGEfxe/t.WUYL1nOHzR6g38VQmUO6t5vLsNQvk1thPJhTygDsvUyd9tfbJz5ib.:10091:0:99999:7:::
setup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
remotesetup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
RUNPUyBUZWNobm9sb2d5IEdtYkg6IGNvbmYtc2lnbtlpePrdaFQhGVMzvKCum1Se8f8kAQBUo7BcQAy9GeRSx2+cRPHJPzSg792pvZ4Ib5RYVbb6GOJdO92mrdFN4JwQhcb5unnmJLa9GX3XpBC2Ujh8AmZsBW2Q06h0ka0qfxJMkcmRDZ3LxOU/GjG/vGnyiymlk1g8iUdYf6u7NNZ0HVoz1HC8dQdZgcH1J5cHnOFGgVl4oak207tnUpgziAwSkALddZHR0jJ7sNiNlboIMToqPmM2lxYJulRCzWcplFoiHkvhEZos0m1TI9NnEA+nlp38cSWBf5lOytN10eeVnaov+uGAp2Xl22avmZmOz6c0K4TttTKGdi1+i2/Tzgs3Jhwegn3b4fNrvp5iB8/umBsYR3i2AQYBHxQAAAAAAAECfk1vZHVsZSBzaWduYXR1cmUgYXBwZW5kZWR+Cg==

_Steps to reproduce:_

a. Install the Ecos System Management in a virtual machine and shut the VM down
b. Mount disk image in an external OS
c. Verify a file /usr/msrc/certs/shadow.new exists and contains the hash of a
set password for user root
d. Change the password in /etc/shadow by modifying the hash
e. Boot appliance again
f. Log into the appliance using SSH and your password

_Potential implications:_

- The vendor has the possibility to use the root account as backdoor and log
into the appliance at any time.
- The vendor may download private configuration, e.g. private keys
and passwords.
- The vendor may modify existing configurations, e.g. switch to an insecure
encryption scheme or activate VNC connections to associated SBSes.
- If the vendor should ever have a security problem itself, e.g. an disloyal
employee or compromised software, other parties might use this backdoor.
- If the same password is used for all customers:
- An attacker might brute-force the root account and use the backdoor in
other installations.
- If the password is ever used, an attacker might record it using a
man-in-the-middle attack and make it available to third parties.

_Potential mitigation measures:_

a. Either mount the Ecos System Management partition using an external system
and reset the password. It may be required to disable the update system to
make changes permanent. OR
b. Disable root access in sshd_config. OR
c. Disable access to the Ecos System Management on port 22 using an
external firewall. The SSH process listening at port 909 seems to have root
access disabled.

2. Easy enrollment susceptible to man-in-the-middle attacks

The easy enrollment feature allows remote users to initialize their new SBS by
entering an "activation code" and a six digit "passphrase". This initial
enrollment is technically performed by downloading the required configuration
from a central management appliance, whose IP address is encoded in the
activation code. To authenticate with the management appliance the SBS uses an
SSH connection to port 909. It uses password authentication scheme with a
username and password directly derived from activation code and passphrase. As
the SSH fingerprint of the authentication server is _not_ checked, activation
code and passphrase may be obtained by a simple man-in-the-middle attack.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/enrollmentMITM.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- An attacker may perform any action happening in a legitimate
easy enrollment. He may also abort an enrollment process at any time to keep
the activation code legitimate. The attack may happen transparent to
the end-user.
- The stick of a user may be impersonated.

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Use easy enrollment only in trusted networks.
Using easy enrollment with a smartcard may be secure, as it requires a smartcard
initialization in an offline step, but we have not verified this.

3. Easy enrollment allows download of arbitrary user credentials

After easy enrollment established an SSH connection, the stick tunnels HTTP
requests through it. The answers contain files for an initial bootstrapping,
e.g. they include public and private keys to connect over SSH in a later step.
After obtaining the files, the activation code is usually deleted from the
database.

However, we found that by using an activation code/passphrase pair, an attacker
may establish arbitrary port forwardings in the management appliance. Hence, an
attacker may use the credential above to connect to ports that are solely bound
to the localhost of the management appliance. The central CouchDB is listening
on port 5984 and may be instructed to dump the credentials of _arbitrary_ sticks
and users. Furthermore, the activation code does not have to be deleted, so that
the attack may stay unnoticed.

_Video:_
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/enrollmentKeyExtraction.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- An attacker, who gained access to a valid activation code (the passphrase
does not contain suffient entropy) or who performed a successful
man-in-the-middle attack, may compromise the keys of _all_ users.
- The attacker may also modify the management database, e.g. enabling VNC
server with a weak password.
- Further internal services or even other hosts might be accessed (which we
have not explored).

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Make sure easy enrollment may only be used
inside trusted networks, i.e. not over the Internet, by blocking port 909 (will
have side effects). Only trusted users must obtain an activation code.

4. SBS leaks key material on reset

Ecos states: The usage of the stick does not leave traces. It is hence ruled out
that conclusions on connection or working data may be drawn. ("Die Nutzung des
Sticks hinterlA$?sst keinerlei Spuren, womit es ausgeschlossen ist RA1/4ckschlA1/4sse
auf Verbindungsdaten oder Arbeitsdaten zu nehmen.")

Despite this statement, we (obviously) found that after _cold_ reset of an Ecos
SBS, i.e. user hits the reset button, confidential key material is left in main
system memory. A compromised host OS may read this key material from
"uninitialized" memory. This may also happen, if the user is resetting a PC
using Ecos SBS, continuing his work with the SBS, properly shutting it down and
booting into the untrusted OS (the memory is not completely overwritten by the
OS).

_Steps to reproduce:_

a. Download and prepare RAM imaging utility from
https://github.com/dbrant/bios_memimage
b. Hit Reset while running Ecos Secure Boot Stick OS
c. Extract long-term and short term secrets using the RAM imaging utility.
Depending on the used hardware an interpretation may require an additional
descrambling (see [1] or [2] for details). The MSI Z170A GAMING M7 board is
verified to work without descrambling.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/coldBoot.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- A compromised host OS (or with lower probability even applications) may
obtain secrets that should have been securely kept in the SBS. Keying
material that may be compromised includes:
- Private keys to authenticate the stick to the management
- Private keys to establish connections to VPN/websites
- Symmetric keys that protect VPN connections and terminal server sessions
- Symmetric keys that protect firmware and user configuration
- Attackers may enforce this situation to extract key material "contained" in
a stick.
- A malicious user may extract or modify the user configuration on a stick by
using extracted keys (see findings 8 & 10).

_Potential mitigation measures:_ After a reset users must unplug power supply
and potentially remove laptop batteries for several seconds to ensure the memory
is wiped, before booting an untrusted OS. Older types of RAM may require a power
off for an even longer period of time. Devices, that cannot be securely turned
off, i.e. without removable batteries, should not be used. Long-term secrets
should be better protected when a smartcard is used, however we have not
verified this option.

5. SBS may be cloned

The vendor advertises the stick as a 2-factor-authenticator with a certificate
being paired with "the" hardware ID of the stick (Ecos: "Zertifikat, gekoppelt
an die Hardware-ID des Sticks"). This suggests that the stick may not be cloned
by an attacker or compromised software.

We found that the SBS is not sufficiently protected against cloning, as the idea
of a "hardware ID" is deceptive for current generations of USB storage sticks.
An attacker may set parameters such as vendor and product ID as well as the
serial number on generic USB storage sticks [3]. A malicious software must then
only perform a byte-level reproduction of the stick, e.g. using the well know
dd-tool on a Unix system. Note that this copying does not require physical
access, but the content may be transferred to a remote site, if the stick is
plugged into a PC that is running compromised OS.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickClone.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- Sticks may be remotely or locally duplicated without the user noticing this,
violating the possession requirement of the 2-factor-authentication.
- As the "firmware" of the stick is not activated, this may be performed even
if a boot passphrase is set.
- Attackers may create "backups" of certain stick configurations and restore
state if a configuration is remotely revoked or the SBS is seized.

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Users must not plug an SBS into a device
running untrusted hard- or software. This may include compromised USB equipment,
like hubs, etc. Using a different form of a second factor, i.e. smart cards
should help, but has not been verified by us. Strong passphrases increase the
strength of the "first factor", i.e. the actual physical possession of a stick
is less relevant for the established level of security. Rely on certificate
revocation in accessible remote services (VPN concentrator, RDP servers or
internal websites) in the case of a compromise, not on possession of an SBS. In
case of a central VPN concentrator, it may be useful to monitor sessions for
parallel logins.

6. SBS may be booted in virtual environment

The vendor statement: Before execution of the firmware a check is performed, to
determine if the stick was booted in a virtual machine. This prevents that
security measures of the stick are undermined and, for example, a keylogger or
Trojan on the host records screen content or keyboard strokes. ("Vor AusfA1/4hrung
der Firmware erfolgt eine PrA1/4fung, ob der Stick in einer virtuellen Maschine
gebootet wurde. Dies verhindert, dass die SchutzmaAnahmen des Sticks unterlaufen
werden und beispielsweise ein Keylogger oder Trojaner auf dem Hostsystem
Bildschirminhalte oder TastaturanschlA$?ge protokolliert.")

Developing good detection and concealment strategies for virtual machines is an
ongoing war between virus authors and anti-virus vendors, for example. From a
theoretical point of view the detection of a VM environment is not possible
under all circumstances. However, practically it may be difficult to build an
undetectable virtualization environment (see [4]).

This raises the question how well protection mechanisms against virtualization
attacks work in SBS. Error messages indicate it is part of the cryptographic
protection mechanisms. Strings in the involved executable show astonishing
similarities to the virtualization detection in systemd (see
https://github.com/systemd/systemd/blob/master/src/basic/virt.c) for the
involved GPL code. However, systemd was never build to protect against malicious
activities, so it is not surprising that starting KVM with the following command
is sufficient to boot the stick in a VM:

kvm -m 2048 \
-cpu host,kvm=off,-hypervisor \
-usb -device usb-ehci,id=ehci \
-device usb-host,bus=ehci.0,vendorid=0x8564,productid=0x1000 \
-smbios 'type=0,vendor=' -smbios 'type=1,manufacturer=,product='

In case an attacker should not have direct access to a stick, but only to an
image (e.g. copied from a compromised OS), a simple patching of QEMU may make
the same approach feasible. Blueprints are
https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/qemu-discuss/2015-07/msg00072.html.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/virtualization.mp4

_Potential implications:_

There are two main scenarios how this finding may lead to a successful attack:

1. The legitimate user virtualizes himself by intend, e.g. for reasons of
convenience or to capture video output. The latter should explicitly be
impossible according to the SBS vendor. (Creating, saving, printing or
forwarding screen captures is prevented by a secure access solution, "Das
Erstellen, Abspeichern, Drucken oder Weiterleiten von Bildschirmkopien wird
A1/4ber eine sichere ZugangslAPsung verhindert.")
2. The user is not aware of the system being virtualized. Like demonstrated
over 10 years ago, it is possible for malicious software to simply
virtualize operating systems to hide their existence (see [5]). Even for the
dedicatedly booted SBS numerous transparent virtualization attacks are
imaginable, e.g.:

- A compromised OS may change the UEFI NVRAM to modify the boot order,
which is an official API function. It makes sure to be always
booted first. If an Ecos sticks is plugged-in, it is booted in a
virtual machine.
- A compromised OS does not properly shutdown, after the user
clicked "reboot". Instead it shows a short video of a BIOS output and
starts the Ecos stick in a virtual machine.
- A malicious software modifies the SBS, such that it always boots in a
virtual machine (see finding 10 why this is possible).

A virtualized Ecos SBS system may be introspected and modified at any time.
Hence, it is possible to

- Record user behavior, session and long-term keys, PINs as well
as passphrases. Thus, giving both factors of the 2-factor-authenticaton in
the hands of an attacker
- The virtualizer may modify running programs, the SBS OS and the
involved data.
- Any extracted data may be communicated to remote locations, i.e. the
attacker does not have to get physical access to the SBS.

All in all, no security goals may be accomplished if virtualization is not
effectively prevented.

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Users must not plug an SBS into a device
running untrusted hard- or software. Administrators must be aware that users
might use virtualization to run their sticks. If users cannot be fully trusted
the SBS cannot ensure the claimed security objectives.

7. SBS is susceptible to backdoors in hardware firmware

Firmware backdoors may access and modify sensible data during operation of Ecos
SBS. The vendor states: ECOS SECURE LINUX takes control of the connected
periphery, so that even malicious software residing in BIOS or UEFI does not
pose a thread ("ZusA$?tzlich A1/4bernimmt das ECOS SECURE LINUX die Hoheit A1/4ber die
angeschlossene Peripherie, so dass selbst eine Schadsoftware im BIOS oder im
UEFI keine Bedrohung darstellt.").

This statement is rather surprising, as it contradicts to:

- Past and current opinion of the research community (see [6] or [7])
- The view of a notable privacy project also relying on a secure boot medium
in untrustworthy hardware
(Tails: https://tails.boum.org/doc/about/warning/index.en.html)
- Statements by Intel (e.g.
https://firmware.intel.com/sites/default/files/STM_User_Guide-001.pdf)

To validate the vendor statement, we decided to modify an open-source UEFI
backdoor from https://github.com/Cr4sh/SmmBackdoor. We added a very simple
memory replacement strategy, which allows to portably extract IPsec keys and
transmit them over the Internet. The result are about 600 lines of C code, which
we could install in our MSI Z170A GAMING M7 motherboard from an administrative
account in the host OS (an unmodified Windows). To do so we simply downloaded a
current UEFI from the MSI website, modified it using
https://github.com/LongSoft/UEFITool, and "upgraded" using the official MSI tool
chain. The approach is highly flexible and may be also deployed using targeted
mails or a https://hakshop.com/products/usb-rubber-ducky-deluxe) (see video.

As expected, the Ecos SBS cannot protect against the extraction of key material
residing in the memory of an untrusted PC. We were able to extract IPsec keys
from the "hardened" Linux kernel of the SBS and decrypt an encapsulated RDP
session in real time.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/smmBackdoor.mp4

We can also show that it is possible to patch executables in an SBS on the fly.
For demonstration purposes this has been the login process, but others are also
possible.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/loginPatch.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- A firmware backdoor may modify any running OS, program, and user data on the
fly and unnoticeable.
- It may extract data, such as long-term and session keys, passphrases and
PINs from memory and read storage devices.
- It can bypass any host-local firewall rules to communicate gathered results
to Internet hosts.

All in all, no security goals may be accomplished if the hardware or the
involved firmware is compromised.

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Users must not plug an SBS into a device
running untrusted hard- or software.

8. Constructed trust-chain does not suit operational needs

Ecos advertises UEFI Secure Boot support of its stick to be a security feature.
They furthermore state: In a "Chain-of Trust" bootloader, kernel and
applications verify each other in a permanently repeating process ("In einer
A>>Chain-of TrustA<< A1/4berprA1/4fen sich Bootloader, Kernel und Applikationen
gegenseitig durch einen sich permanent wiederholenden Prozess.").

Already the previous two findings indicate that it is not the BIOS/UEFI that
needs to verify integrity and authenticity of the booted OS, but the booted OS
must verify that it started in an authentic environment. UEFI Secure Boot does
simply not realize this security property. While there has been considerable
effort by Ecos to realize the signature verification "top-down" from the UEFI,
an attacker might just remove signature verifications in each component or
replace them with own components, e.g. a vanilla Linux kernel. UEFI Secure Boot
only effectively prevents the boot of such a modified system if all of the
following conditions are met:

- The UEFI and other hardware components are not compromised (see
finding above).
- The vendor has sovereignty over all UEFI keys and make sure their bootloader
is the only one booting. Currently Microsoft owns the keys and allows
signature of third-party bootloaders. Also their own bootloader is known to
be vulnerable
(see https://www.heise.de/security/meldung/Kardinalfehler-Microsoft-setzt-aus-Versehen-Secure-Boot-schachmatt-3291946.html).
- The USB stick (or some other trusted instance) prevents to be booted on a
system that is not protected by UEFI Secure Boot under the conditions above.

The last condition implies that the stick must verify its surrounding somehow.
The stick currently performs measurements of the booted kernel only (not the
BIOS/UEFI nor the actually active bootloader). However, even this authentication
happens only at two places; the process decrypting the OS image and
configuration being the more sophisticated one. We concentrate at the robustness
of this verification step in the following. An actual exploitation of the
insufficient trust-chain will happen in finding 10.

To access the encrypted parts on the SBS, an initial user-land process (the init
binary contained in the Linux' initrd image on partition 4) measures kernel,
stick and active user environment and uses this information to derive keying
material. The system stops with a decryption failed error, if modifications have
been made. Modification of the load chain, i.e. by starting other processes
first, change the measurement, and modifications later in the boot chain are
impossible as the following parts are encrypted. An attacker might decompile and
reverse engineer the involved binaries, however there is a more convenient and
flexible way: Recently, there have been advances in sandboxing environments, so
we used https://usercorn.party to run the key derivation process and trap its
system calls. Using this technique we can tightly control what the process sees
and things that should be hidden from it, e.g. it is possible to give the
signature verification a different image than the one being mounted later on
etc. If no boot passphrase is set, this attack will allow the extraction of all
secrets stored on the SBS.

Note that some additional syscalls need to be mocked in usercorn to prevent
premature termination. However, these do not need to provide any real
functionality other than indicating successful execution to the caller and are
therefore a straight forward addition.

Furthermore, note that usercorn is not the only way to perform such a
modification of the control flow. We see at least five other ways:

1. Modify syscall arguments in a custom Linux kernel, e.g., mark the process
and if it wants to read the contents of /proc/keys give it some other file
to read.
2. Modify syscall arguments using ptrace and seccomp during runtime.
(https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/ptrace-redirect)
3. Start the binary in a debugger and place breakpoints at each int 80h (i.e.
syscall) instruction. Modify the contents of the registers that contain
arguments to the syscall.
4. A string analysis of the init binary strongly suggests that it contains code
under GPL, which would mean that all of its code needs to comply with GPL.
In this case the vendor would be required to provide the full source code to
its users, who may modify and redistribute it. If an attacker obtains the
published code, he can build his own init binary with arbitrary changes.
5. An attacker may reverse engineer and change parts of the init binary's
machine code directly in order to modify its behavior, e.g., to skip
signature verifications or redirect file system access.

_Video:_
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/offlineKeyExtraction.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- If no boot passphrase is set, this finding will allow an attacker to extract
of all user configurations, including but not limited to private keys.
- If a boot passphrase is set, the decryption will allow for an automatic
offline brute-forcing of passphrases. If the passphrase is weak, the very
same files may be extracted.
- In either case, encryption keys of stick-specific configuration files and
firmware images may be derived without booting the SBS. This is a
prerequisite for exploitation of the following two findings.

_Potential mitigation measures:_

- Enforce boot passphrases that are not susceptible to bruteforce attacks. AND
- Users must ensure that they really boot from the plugged-in stick (turn off
computer and enter BIOS to verify boot order before starting SBS), as a
compromised OS may simply mock the Ecos environment using application layer
emulation and the decrypted firmware to obtain cryptographic material to
bruteforce the passphrase. AND
- Use a stick with hardware support to make it read-only (see finding 10
for details) and use the stick only in read-write mode in fully
trusted environments.

9. Remote root login in Ecos SBS

Using the method sketched above, it is not only possible to extract the so
called "firmware" image and user-specific configurations, but also a global
configuration for the stick (residing in basedata/certs on the forth partition).
This is always possible, even if a passphrase is set, and not known to the
attacker. This folder contains (among others) an encrypted and signed shadow
file. In our case it has the following content:

root:$6$kD.Sv/YPnhZqNwXw$xHvghwrKESSS4inwjPRFt5UNgsLXRuuCtUUIP1.W7qK08NkBF.n/vT7iRpSH4hLB2aZ8iPtuNQ20mlVoEaNgk1:10091:0:99999:7:::
setup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
remotesetup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
RUNPUyBUZWNobm9sb2d5IEdtYkg6IGNvbmYtc2lnbtlpePrdaFQhGVMzvKCum1Se8f8kAQAytCKRbYYaeiWywek18P0AAJ43Yhy/VUvpMUBdRom8Wd/WISBXe23ZqumopgwNDglYvcSm28AK+tufQxcX8P4MspVLuI07CH9CGLmPqgzffP0gqpPFbSsEGtBiCX/9h5epu7ARnGfKst/2uWLLSvXidcKqht2A6f38QxNO7MGxrKZ5wDOkqTnJx3nxjKFfN5Rpmlyz7gLo8s+VscAPqf6if8QzH6rksRHRAKFzPGcCtVKExNA5dxURNFGU10NUtuZUE5ZbawLSfhbxNenLBf3bAMLdKNxIPVZsJhPUEvHJntyK73Dype5o3JXiLmiPo/GSXmp31NCl50cAyvNFyIYpAQYBHxQAAAAAAAECfk1vZHVsZSBzaWduYXR1cmUgYXBwZW5kZWR+Cg==

The base64-encoded signature points to Ecos, i.e., it is not generated by the
management appliance. A shadow file is already present on sticks that come
directly from the vendor, and that have not been enrolled. This indicates the
possibility for another undocumented root login, not only to the management
appliance, but also to sticks itself. We have verified this login to work
remotely over SSH in another finding below.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/sbsRootAccess.mp4

_Potential implications:_

- The vendor has the possibility to use the root account as backdoor and log
into SBS when it is active.
- The vendor may access files on the private hard drive of the PC (Vendor
statement: No access to private photos and mails, "Schutz vor Zugriff auf
private Fotos und E-Mails"). Nevertheless, the operating system kernel
contains an NTFS driver, which may be used by a remotely logged-in
root user.
- The vendor may download private configuration, e.g. private keys
and passwords.
- The vendor may modify existing configurations, e.g. switch to an insecure
encryption scheme.
- If the vendor should ever have a security problem itself, e.g. an disloyal
employee or compromised software, other parties might use this backdoor.
- If the same password is used for all customers:
- An attacker might brute-force the root account and use the backdoor in
other installations.
- If the password is ever used, a fake SSH service might record it and
make it available to third parties.

_Potential mitigation measures:_ Users must not use the SBS in scenarios where a
remote SSH access is possible, e.g. the open Internet without an external
firewall that supresses incoming SSH connections.

10. Content on SBS may be maliciously modified

Vendor statement: Write protected partition for firmware and applications
("SchreibgeschA1/4tzte Partition fA1/4r Firmware und Applikationen")

Thus, a more technically correct statement would be that unauthorized writes
will be detected, e.g. by verifying signatures. However, also this more relaxed
statement is not always kept, as we discuss with the help the following three
scenarios.

Replacing the SBS completely

As the SBS is a "normal" USB mass storage device, a compromised OS may simply
overwrite the whole stick with malicious content. For example, it could place a
minimal OS on the stick, which instantly infects any host operating system, e.g.
a Windows. Afterwards it could show an Ecos SBS logo and an error message, e.g.
"Your PC is unsupported, please plug the SBS in a different one".

Using this approach an attacker could try to spread his malware from a users
home PC to others inside the company network.

Hijacking the root login

As mentioned above, the so-called "firmware", i.e. the main OS of the SBS, is
protected by a signature. However, the configuration is only protected by an
authentication code. Hence, we can use the keys obtained for decryption (see
finding 8) to also modify the content of the configuration; possibly without
being noticed. Note, that there are two configurations: one being specific to
one of the boot configurations and one being stick specific. Only the first one
is protected by the boot passphrase. Therefore, an attacker may modify the
stick-specific configuration _without_ knowing the boot passphrase. Using the
knowledge from the finding 8 we can modify the shadow file to set a custom
password. There is an obstacle to avoid: use the old crypt method to create the
shadow file and make sure there is an update.conf file, which seems to be
present on some sticks only. It contains the following data:

reltype=V5.6.5
bbtype=mthc
fn1=ca.crt
fn2=base.pem
fn3=runtime.pem
fn4=shadow
fn5=my.pem

force-reltype=1

After this modification an attacker may access the stick via SSH regardless on
which computer it is booted from (given a network connection). Over the SSH
session he may obtain long- and short-term secrets, access the "private" hard
drive of the user (remember the SBS even contains an NTFS driver for this) or
modify the user's SBS configuration. Furthermore, the "hardened" OS contains a
tool to create screenshots of the active session (xwd) and even a VNC server, so
that it is possible to monitor the session in real time or even interact. The
passive monitoring is not indicated to the SBS user, unless the attacker chooses
to do so.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickMod1.mp4

Modifying executables in the SBS

Even without the exploitation of the weakly protected part of the configuration,
it is possible to modify a stick in a way, such that signature checks are
completely removed and a backdoor is implanted, which infects user OSes and
spreads over SBS, for example. To do so, the initial static signature checks of
the stick may be evaded by installing a custom bootloader (using the Ecos theme)
and kernel, as well as an init-Stage with a slightly modified control flow. See
finding 8 for different ways to influence the control flow.

Ecos states: If a modification is detected, the stick shuts itself down. A
manipulation of the stick, no matter if running or in power-cycled state, is
therefore effectively prevented. ("Wird eine Manipulation erkannt, schaltet sich
der Stick sofort ab. Eine Manipulation des Sticks, egal ob im laufenden Betrieb
oder im ausgeschalteten Zustand, wird so wirkungsvoll verhindert.") However, we
found it rather difficult to trigger this security monitoring, which seems to be
based on whitelists. It seems only few files are monitored, e.g. out of the 663
files in the /bin directory of the hardened operating system, we found only a
handful being supervised. Hence, it is rather simple to evade this protection
mechanism. In our case we simply replaced /bin/insmod in the root partition of
the Ecos OS, as it is called on a regular basis and not protected by the above
means.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickMod2.mp4

Discussion of malicious modification

_Potential implications:_

The implications of this finding heavily depend on the scenario of attack and
attacker sophistication. Main threats are:

- The attacker might use the SBS to spread malware from host to host; possibly
infecting other SBSes.
- While doing so he may exfiltrate private data stored on the PCs as well as
credentials and configurations stored on the stick (despite a potentially
strong boot passphrase).
- When modifying the init process, he may capture the boot passphrase (if he
should need it somewhere else, as the configuration is available in
decrypted form) or smart card PIN.
- If a smartcard is used, the attacker may make use of it as long as the SBS
is active.
- The attacker may disable any SBS-internal firewall.
- The attacker may trigger communication from the compromised SBS, e.g. to
contact a command and control server.
- Depending on the abilities of the attacker, all of these attacks may be
concealed, i.e. the user will not be able to recognize it as the functional
aspects of SBS still continue to work correctly.

_Potential mitigation measures:_

Users must not plug an SBS into a device running untrusted hard- or software. Do
not use the stick in multiple PCs to prevent a spreading of malware via the SBS
itself.


3. Conclusion

This document presented various weaknesses in the Ecos SBS and its management
platform. We concentrated our analysis on the boot process and the Easy
Enrollment feature. Nevertheless we found many of the security statements
communicated by the website and brochures to be violated, among others:

- The usage of the stick does not leave traces. It is hence ruled out that
conclusions on connection or working data may be drawn. ("Die Nutzung des
Sticks hinterlA$?sst keinerlei Spuren, womit es ausgeschlossen ist
RA1/4ckschlA1/4sse auf Verbindungsdaten oder Arbeitsdaten zu nehmen.", finding 4)
- Certificate paired with the hardware ID of the stick ("Zertifikat, gekoppelt
an die Hardware-ID des Sticks", finding 5)
- Before execution of the firmware a check is performed, to determine if the
stick was booted in a virtual machine. This prevents that security measures
of the stick are undermined and, for example, a keylogger or Trojan on the
host records screen content or keyboard strokes. ("Vor AusfA1/4hrung der
Firmware erfolgt eine PrA1/4fung, ob der Stick in einer virtuellen Maschine
gebootet wurde. Dies verhindert, dass die SchutzmaAnahmen des Sticks
unterlaufen werden und beispielsweise ein Keylogger oder Trojaner auf dem
Hostsystem Bildschirminhalte oder TastaturanschlA$?ge protokolliert.",
finding 6)
- Creating, saving, printing or forwarding screen captures is prevented by a
secure access solution, ("Das Erstellen, Abspeichern, Drucken oder
Weiterleiten von Bildschirmkopien wird A1/4ber eine sichere ZugangslAPsung
verhindert.", finding 6 and 9)
- ECOS SECURE LINUX takes control of the connected periphery, so that even
malicious software residing in BIOS or UEFI does not pose a thread
("ZusA$?tzlich A1/4bernimmt das ECOS SECURE LINUX die Hoheit A1/4ber die
angeschlossene Peripherie, so dass selbst eine Schadsoftware im BIOS oder im
UEFI keine Bedrohung darstellt.", finding 7).
- In a "Chain-of Trust" bootloader, kernel and applications verify each other
in a permanently repeating process ("In einer A>>Chain-of TrustA<< A1/4berprA1/4fen
sich Bootloader, Kernel und Applikationen gegenseitig durch einen sich
permanent wiederholenden Prozess.", finding 8 and 10).
- No access to private photos and mails ("Schutz vor Zugriff auf private Fotos
und E-Mails", finding 9 and 10)
- Write protected partition for firmware and applications ("SchreibgeschA1/4tzte
Partition fA1/4r Firmware und Applikationen", finding 10)
- A manipulation of the stick, no matter if running or in power-cycled state,
is therefore effectively prevented. ("Wird eine Manipulation erkannt,
schaltet sich der Stick sofort ab. Eine Manipulation des Sticks, egal ob im
laufenden Betrieb oder im ausgeschalteten Zustand, wird so wirkungsvoll
verhindert.", finding 10)

Additionally, we found potential vendor backdoors, a man-in-the-middle
vulnerability and the possibility to mirror the internal management database,
containing all private keys of associated sticks.

While some of the findings may be results of sloppiness, e.g. having enabled
root logins or being able to download all private keys, most of them are based
on conceptual mistakes. Out of these, the [SE] and [SX] version of the stick
might mitigate finding 5 if used with a smartcard. However, the root causes of
findings 4, 6, 7 & 8 lay within limitations of the current x86 platform. We do
not believe they can be fixed, without requiring additional hardware
capabilities or trustworthy hardware all together.

In macroscopic scale our findings are also rather interesting, as they emphasize
the low value of IT security tests, when introducing a new product in a company.
Most of the reference companies and authorities cited by Ecos claimed that they
have done internal or external tests to validate the security of the product.
The testimonials imply that no severe security issues have been found at all. We
invested about a month besides our main projects for the above findings. Most
likely a pentester, with less resources, can simply not surpass the multiple
layers of cryptographic obfuscation. Even our less constrained time schedule did
not allow a full coverage of the attack vectors the SBS approach offers. It is
particularly alarming that some of the vendor claims contradict to common
opinions of security experts -- apparently with causing significant suspicion.
Most prominently:

- The detection of virtualized environment cannot be guaranteed.
- Current firmwares (EFI but also Intel ME and others) must not be
considered secure.
- USB devices must not be trusted (see [8] for further ways of exploitation).

Furthermore, already the basic BSI IT-Grundschutz contains in section M4.63 the
requirement "The telecommuting computer should provide a boot protection
mechanism to prevent booting from removable data media, e.g. from DVDs or USB
sticks, without authorisation." However, there are no hardware mechanisms to
ensure that only authentic sticks can be boot, yet Ecos claims conformance to
M4.63.


4. Credits

Findings discovered and exploited by Robert Lasch, Franz Girlich and Michael
Rossberg (in no particular order). Guenter Schaefer served as scientific
advisor[1].

Please contact Michael Rossberg via michael [dot] rossberg [at] tu [dash]
ilmenau [dot] de for questions or comments. GPG fingerprint: FD9B 425C 8DE5 69D6
77ED 52C2 CC00 C314 0337 76C9


5. Disclosure Timeline

- 13/04/2018 - Vendor informed
- 30/04/2018 - BSI allows usage of [SX] and [SE] variants of the stick for
VS-NfD data (i.e. Germany national level: Confidential)
- 13/06/2018 - Disclosure


6. References

[1] J. Bauer, M. Gruhn, and F. C. Freiling, aLest we forget: Cold-boot attacks
on scrambled DDR3 memory,a _Digital Investigation_, vol. 16, pp. S65aS74, 2016.

[2] S. F. Yitbarek, M. T. Aga, R. Das, and T. Austin, aCold boot attacks are
still hot: Security analysis of memory scramblers in modern processors,a in
_High performance computer architecture (HPCA), 2017 IEEE international
symposium on_, 2017, pp. 313a324.

[3] G. Ravago, aReverse engineering a USB flash drive.a 2015.

[4] A. Sergeev, V. Minchenkov, and V. Bashun, aMalicious hypervisor and hidden
virtualization of operation systems,a in _Application of information and
communication technologies (AICT), 2015 9th international conference on_, 2015,
pp. 178a182.

[5] J. Rutkowska, aIntroducing blue pill,a _The official blog of the
invisiblethings.org_, vol. 22, p. 23, 2006.

[6] S. Embleton and S. Sparks, aSMM rootkits,a in _Proceedings of the 4th
International Conference on Security and Privacy in Communication Networks,
Securecomm_, 2008, vol. 8.

[7] J. Rutkowska, aIntel x86 considered harmful,a _the Invisible Things Lab_,
2015.

[8] K. Nohl and J. Lell, aBadUSB a on accessories that turn evil,a _Black Hat
USA_, 2014.

[1] Disclaimer for reasons of transparency: Guenter Schaefer is primarily
serving as full professor at Technische UniversitA$?t Ilmenau. Furthermore, he is
also member of the supervisory board of secunet Security Networks AG.


========= GERMAN VERSION ==============


SICHERHEITSHINWEIS



MEHRERE SICHERHEITSLACKEN IN ECOS SECURE BOOT STICK (SBS)


- Software: Ecos Secure Boot Stick
- Version: Stick Version 5.6.5, System Management Version 5.2.68
- Status: Hersteller informiert
- VerAPffentlicht am: 13.06.2018

Die aktuellste Version des Dokuments ist unter
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/advisory-de.html erhA$?ltlich.


1. Aberblick

Der Ecos Secure Boot Stick soll auch aus unsicheren Umgebungen heraus einen
sicheren Zugriff auf Terminalserver und Webservices bieten. Dazu wird in einem
herkAPmmlichen PC, A1/4ber den keine speziellen Annahmen getroffen werden, vom
USB-Stick ein Betriebssystem gebootet. Der Hersteller schreibt: "Der ECOS SECURE
BOOT STICK ermAPglicht einen hochsicheren Zugang zu einer Terminalserver- oder
Virtual-Desktop-Infrastruktur und Webanwendungen aus einer gesicherten Umgebung
heraus."

Referenzkunden sind deutsche BehAPrden, Banken, Versicherungen und KrankenhA$?user.
Die Zahlen auf der Webseite lassen darauf schlieAen, dass einige Tausend SBS im
Umlauf sind. Dieses Dokument beschreibt eine Reihe von Schwachstellen, die bei
einer Sicherheitsuntersuchung des Boot Sticks und der dazugehAPrigen Management
Appliance entdeckt wurden. Alle gefundenen Schwachstellen fA1/4hren zu einem
Versagen von herstellerseitigen Sicherheitsaussagen oder allgemein akzeptierten
Sicherheitszielen. Typischerweise bedeutet dies den unautorisierten Zugriff
eines kompromittierten Hosts oder einer dritten Partei auf private Daten oder
kryptographisches SchlA1/4sselmaterial.

Hinweis: Es werden keine Aussagen zur VollstA$?ndigkeit der Analyse gegeben.
Insbesondere kAPnnen mAPglicherweise andere Schwachstellen existieren, die ein
hAPheres Risiko darstellen. Es wurde unsererseits weder eine systematische
Bedrohungsanalyse durchgefA1/4hrt, noch wurden Sicherheitsanforderungen abgeleitet.
Stattdessen wird A1/4ber die vom Hersteller formulierten Sicherheitsaussagen und
-maAnahmen sowie allgemein anerkannte Prinzipien (beispielsweise sollten private
SchlA1/4ssel nicht auslesbar sein) argumentiert.

In der Zwischenzeit wurden neue [SE]- und [SX]-Versionen des Produktes auf den
Markt gebracht und durch das Bundesamt fA1/4r Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik
zum Schutz von VS-NfD-Daten zugelassen. Diese beiden Versionen standen uns fA1/4r
Tests nicht zur VerfA1/4gung. Aus diesem Grund kAPnnen wir keine Aussage darA1/4ber
treffen, ob die in diesem Dokument beschriebenen Schwachstellen auch bei den
beiden zugelassenen Produktvarianten zutreffen -- es kann aber auf Basis unseres
Erkenntnisstandes auch nicht ausgeschlossen werden. Das BSI kann eine Zulassung
auch an (in der Regel nicht-APffentliche) Bedingungen knA1/4pfen, die Risiken
mitigieren.


2. Beschreibung der Schwachstellen und mAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen

1. Aktivierter root-Nutzer mit SSH-Zugang im Ecos System Management

Die System Management Appliance enthA$?lt einen aktivierten root-Nutzer, dem
SSH-Zugang erlaubt wird. Die Passwortdatei /etc/shadow zeigt auAerdem, dass ein
Passwort fA1/4r den Nutzer gesetzt ist. Die Datei selbst wird wA$?hrend der
Installation der Appliance von einem Ecos-Server heruntergeladen. Somit
kontrolliert Ecos das Passwort fA1/4r den administrativen Zugang. MAPglicherweise
werden hierbei von Ecos fA1/4r unterschiedliche Kunden verschiedene PasswAPrter
gesetzt, da in die Download-Anfrage der LizenzschlA1/4ssel eingeht. Die in unserem
Setup installierte shadow-Datei hat den folgenden Inhalt (die letzte Zeile ist
eine base64-kodierte Signatur von Ecos):

root:$6$ys8MpGD8fzOj1CMa$8S5YZ2UasC5IVMOoshDevPYeGEfxe/t.WUYL1nOHzR6g38VQmUO6t5vLsNQvk1thPJhTygDsvUyd9tfbJz5ib.:10091:0:99999:7:::
setup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
remotesetup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
RUNPUyBUZWNobm9sb2d5IEdtYkg6IGNvbmYtc2lnbtlpePrdaFQhGVMzvKCum1Se8f8kAQBUo7BcQAy9GeRSx2+cRPHJPzSg792pvZ4Ib5RYVbb6GOJdO92mrdFN4JwQhcb5unnmJLa9GX3XpBC2Ujh8AmZsBW2Q06h0ka0qfxJMkcmRDZ3LxOU/GjG/vGnyiymlk1g8iUdYf6u7NNZ0HVoz1HC8dQdZgcH1J5cHnOFGgVl4oak207tnUpgziAwSkALddZHR0jJ7sNiNlboIMToqPmM2lxYJulRCzWcplFoiHkvhEZos0m1TI9NnEA+nlp38cSWBf5lOytN10eeVnaov+uGAp2Xl22avmZmOz6c0K4TttTKGdi1+i2/Tzgs3Jhwegn3b4fNrvp5iB8/umBsYR3i2AQYBHxQAAAAAAAECfk1vZHVsZSBzaWduYXR1cmUgYXBwZW5kZWR+Cg==

_Schritte zur ReAkaApiAtuAlaAtiAon:_

a. Installation des Ecos System Management in einer virtuellen Maschine
b. Affnen des Festplatten-Images in einem externen Betriebssystem
c. AberprA1/4fung, dass die Datei /usr/msrc/certs/shadow.new existiert und einen
Hash fA1/4r das Passwort des root-Nutzer enthA$?lt
d. Setzen des Passwort-Hashes fA1/4r den root-Nutzer in /etc/shadow auf einen
selbstbestimmten Wert
e. Booten der Appliance
f. SSH-Login mit dem neu gesetzten Passwort

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Der Hersteller hat die MAPglichkeit den root-Nutzer als HintertA1/4r zu
verwenden und kann sich bei direkter NetzkonnektivitA$?t jederzeit in die
Appliance einloggen.
- Der Hersteller kann geheime Konfigurationsparameter, wie private SchlA1/4ssel
und PasswAPrter, abrufen.
- Der Hersteller kann sicherheitskritische Konfigurationsparameter verA$?ndern,
etwa ein unsicheres VerschlA1/4sselungsschema aktivieren oder VNC-Logins auf
den SBS aktivieren.
- Falls der Hersteller jemals selbst von einem Sicherheitsproblem betroffen
sein sollte, beispielsweise durch einen gekA1/4ndigten Mitarbeiter oder eine
Software-Schwachstelle, kAPnnten weitere Parteien das Passwort erhalten.
- Falls dasselbe Passwort fA1/4r alle Kunden der Appliance verwendet wird:
- Ein Angreifer kAPnnte durch einen Brute-Force-Angriff Kenntnis des
Passworts erhalten und Zugriff auf andere Installationen erhalten.
- Falls das Passwort je verwendet werden sollte, kAPnnte es durch einen
Man-in-the-Middle-Angriff in die HA$?nde eines Angreifers gelangen, der es
fA1/4r eigene Zwecke missbrauchen kann.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_

Ein Angriff kann durch einen der folgenden Schritte verhindert werden:

- Das Passwort kann durch ein extern gebootetes System geA$?ndert werden. Dieser
Schritt erfordert unter UmstA$?nden die Abschaltung des Update-Systems, um
sicher zu stellen, dass diese Anderung nicht rA1/4ckgA$?ngig gemacht wird.
- Der Zugriff durch den Nutzer "root" kann in der sshd_config
deaktiviert werden.
- Der Zugriff auf das Ecos System Management kann durch eine externe Firewall
fA1/4r Port 22 unterbunden werden. Der SSH-Prozess auf Port 909 scheint den
Zugriff durch "root" bereits deaktiviert zu haben.

2. Easy Enrollment empfA$?nglich fA1/4r Man-in-the-Middle-Angriffe

Das Easy Enrollment erlaubt es Nutzern ihren SBS (im Auslieferungszustand) A1/4ber
das Internet mit dem Management zu koppeln und zu initialisieren. Die
Authentisierung erfolgt mithilfe eines "Activation Code" und einer "Passphrase",
die aus sechs Ziffern besteht. Diese initiale Inbetriebnahme erfolgt technisch
durch das Kopieren der Konfigurationsparameter von der zentralen Management
Appliance, deren IP-Adresse in den Activation Code kodiert ist. Um sich
gegenA1/4ber dem Management zu authentisieren, baut der SBS eine SSH-Verbindung auf
Port 909 auf. Hierzu wird das SSH-Password-Authentisierungschema benutzt, wobei
der Nutzername und das Passwort sich direkt aus Activation Code und Passphrase
ergeben. Da der kryptographische Fingerprint des SSH Servers _nicht_ A1/4berprA1/4ft
wird, kAPnnen Activation Code und Passphrase durch einen einfachen
Man-in-the-Middle-Angriff abgefangen werden.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/enrollmentMITM.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Ein Angreifer kann jegliche Aktion ausfA1/4hren, die auch bei einem legitimen
Enrollment geschieht. Er kann den Prozess auch jederzeit abbrechen, um den
Code aktiviert zu lassen. Der Angriff kann transparent fA1/4r den
Nutzer erfolgen.
- Der SBS des Nutzers kann durch den Angreifer impersonifiziert werden.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Easy Enrollment darf nur innerhalb von
vertrauenswA1/4rdigen Netzen durchgefA1/4hrt werden. Beim Einsatz von Smartcards
kAPnnte das Easy Enrollment von diesem Angriff nicht betroffen sein, da die
Smartcard-Initialisierung in einem separaten Offline-Schritt erfolgt. Wir haben
dies jedoch nicht verifiziert.

3. Easy Enrollment erlaubt die Extraktion beliebiger Nutzerkonfigurationen

Nach dem der Easy-Enrollment-Prozess einen SSH-Tunnel aufgebaut hat, sendet der
SBS darA1/4ber eine Reihe von HTTP-Anfragen an den Server. Die Antworten enthalten
alle Dateien, die fA1/4r ein initiales Bootstrapping erforderlich sind,
beispielsweise private und APffentliche SSH-SchlA1/4ssel des SBS. Diese werden fA1/4r
spA$?tere SSH-Verbindungen verwendet. Nach Abschluss des initialen Downloads wird
der Activation Code aus der Datenbank gelAPscht.

Ein Angreifer kann einen Activation Code jedoch auch fA1/4r beliebige
SSH-Port-Weiterleitungen auf dem Management benutzen. Dadurch ist es ihm mAPglich
sich auf Ports zu verbinden, die durch Binden an 127.0.0.1 ausschlieAlich
innerhalb des Managements zur VerfA1/4gung stehen sollten. Die zentrale CouchDB des
Managements akzeptiert Anfragen auf Port 5984 und kann dazu gebracht werden die
Nutzerkonfigurationen _beliebiger_ Sticks und Nutzer auszugeben. ZusA$?tzlich muss
der Angreifer den Activation Code nicht lAPschen, sodass der Angriff unbemerkt
geschehen kann.

_Video:_
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/enrollmentKeyExtraction.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Ein Angreifer, der Zugriff auf einen gA1/4ltigen Activation Code erhA$?lt
(Passphrase bietet durch geringe Entropie keinen Schutz) oder der einen
erfolgreichen Man-in-the-Middle-Angriff durchgefA1/4hrt hat, kann die privaten
SchlA1/4ssel _aller_ Nutzer kompromittieren.
- Der Angreifer kann die Management Datenbank verA$?ndern und etwa einen
VNC-Server mit schwachem Passwort auf einigen SBS aktivieren.
- MAPglicherweise kAPnnen weitere private Dienste oder gar andere Hosts
zugA$?nglich sein (wurde unsererseits nicht nA$?her untersucht).

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Easy Enrollment darf nur innerhalb von
vertrauenswA1/4rdigen Netzen durchgefA1/4hrt werden (insbesondere nicht A1/4ber das
Internet), beispielsweise durch Blockieren von Port 909 (mit Seiteneffekten, da
auch andere Management-Komponenten erreichbar sind).

4. SchlA1/4sselmaterial zugreifbar nach Hardware-Reset von SBS

Ecos erklA$?rt: "Die Nutzung des Sticks hinterlA$?sst keinerlei Spuren, womit es
ausgeschlossen ist RA1/4ckschlA1/4sse auf Verbindungsdaten oder Arbeitsdaten zu
nehmen."

Trotz dieser Aussage verbleibt nach einem harten Neustart des PCs (z.B. durch
BetA$?tigen des Reset-Knopfs) wA$?hrend der AusfA1/4hrung des SBS vertrauliches
SchlA1/4sselmaterial im Speicher zurA1/4ck. Ein kompromittiertes Betriebssystem auf
dem Hostrechner kann anschlieAend dieses SchlA1/4sselmaterial aus dem
"uninitialisierten" Hauptspeicher lesen. Dies kann beispielsweise auch bei
folgendem Arbeitsablauf passieren: Ein Nutzer resettet das OS eines Ecos SBS
versehentlich, arbeitet weiter, fA$?hrt seine Ecos-SBS-Sitzung sauber herunter und
bootet in ein kompromittiertes OS. Der Speicher der ersten (abgebrochenen)
Ecos-Sitzung wird dabei nicht notwendigerweise vollstA$?ndig von der zweiten
A1/4berschrieben.

_Schritte zur Rekapitualtion:_

a. Abersetzen und installieren des _RAM imaging utility_ von
https://github.com/dbrant/bios_memimage
b. Reset wA$?hrend das Betriebssystem des Ecos SBS lA$?uft
c. Extraktion von Langzeit- und SitzungsschlA1/4sseln aus dem
erzeugten Speicherabbild. In AbhA$?ngigkeit von der verwendeten Hardware kann
die Interpretation ein weiteres Descrambling erforderlich machen (siehe [1]
und [2]). Das MSI Z170A GAMING M7 Mainboard, welches zu
Demonstrationszwecken verwendet wurde, funktioniert ohne einen
solchen Schritt.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/coldBoot.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Ein kompromittiertes Host-Betriebssystem (oder mit niedrigerer
Wahrscheinlichkeit sogar Anwendungen) kann Zugriff auf SchlA1/4sselmaterial
erhalten, welches durch den SBS gesichert werden sollte. Dies beinhaltet:
- Private SchlA1/4ssel um Sticks gegenA1/4ber dem Management zu authentisieren
- Private SchlA1/4ssel um Sticks gegenA1/4ber VPN-Konzentratoren oder Webseiten
zu authentisieren
- SitzungsschlA1/4ssel die beispielsweise VPN-Verbindungen oder
Terminal-Server-Sitzungen schA1/4tzen
- Symmetrische SchlA1/4ssel, welche die Stick-"Firmware" und
Nutzerkonfiguration sichern
- Angreifer kAPnnen dieses Szenario bewusst hervorrufen, um SchlA1/4sselmaterial
aus dem Stick zu extrahieren
- Angreifer kAPnnen die Nutzerkonfiguration aus dem Stick extrahieren oder
diese auch manipulieren (siehe Schwachstellen 8 & 10).

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Nach einem Neustart mA1/4ssen Nutzer den PC vollstA$?ndig
und fA1/4r mehrere Sekunden vom Strom trennen, um sicherzustellen, dass der
Speicher seinen Zustand verloren hat. Bei Nutzung von A$?lteren RAM-Typen muss der
PC unter UmstA$?nden eine lA$?ngere Zeit vom Strom getrennt werden. GerA$?te, die
nicht sicher ausgeschaltet werden kAPnnen, etwa weil die Akkus nicht zu entfernen
sind, sollten nicht verwendet werden. Langzeitgeheimnisse kAPnnen mAPglicherweise
durch den Einsatz einer externen Smartcard besser geschA1/4tzt werden, wir haben
diese Option jedoch nicht untersucht.

5. SBS kann geklont werden

Der Hersteller bewirbt den Stick zur Nutzung als zweiten Authentisierungsfaktor,
bei dem das Zertifikat an die Hardware-ID des Sticks gekoppelt wird (wAPrtlich
"Zertifikat, gekoppelt an die Hardware-ID des Sticks"). Dies suggeriert, dass
der Stick nicht durch einen Angreifer beziehungsweise kompromittierte Software
geklont werden kann.

Der SBS ist nicht ausreichend gegen ein Klonen geschA1/4tzt, da aktuelle
Generationen von USB-Speicher-Sticks schlicht A1/4ber keine feste "Hardware-ID"
verfA1/4gen. Ein Angreifer kann Parameter wie die Vendor- und Product-ID sowie die
Seriennummern auf allgemein verfA1/4gbaren Speicher-Sticks frei A$?ndern [3]. Ein
Angreifer beziehungsweise eine bAPsartige Software muss anschlieAend nur eine
1:1-Kopie des Sticks erstellen (zum Beispiel durch Nutzung von dd auf einem
Unix-System). Anzumerken ist, dass hierzu kein physischer Zugang erforderlich
ist. Alle erforderlichen Inhalte des Sticks kAPnnte A1/4ber das Internet A1/4bertragen
werden, sobald der Stick in einen PC gesteckt wird auf dem eine kompromittierte
Software aktiv ist.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickClone.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Sticks kAPnnen lokal oder entfernt dupliziert werden, sodass der Faktor
"Besitz" umgangen wird. Dies kann vom Nutzer unbemerkt erfolgen.
- Da die "Firmware" des Sticks nicht aktiviert wird, kann dies auch ohne
Wissen des Bootkennworts erfolgen.
- Angreifer kAPnnen "Backups" von bestimmten Stick-Konfigurationen erstellen
und den entsprechenden Zustand wiederherstellen falls diese zentral
verA$?ndert oder der SBS eingezogen wurde (beispielsweise nach Beendigung
eines DienstverhA$?ltnisses).

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Nutzer sollten den SBS nicht in GerA$?ten verwenden,
deren Hard- und Software nicht in vollen Umfang vertraut werden kann. Dies
schlieAt mAPglicherweise kompromittiertes USB-Equipment, wie Hubs, mit ein. Die
Nutzung eines anderen zweiten Faktors, wie einer Smartcard sollte das Problem
beheben, dies wurde im Rahmen der Analyse jedoch nicht nA$?her untersucht. Starke
BootpasswAPrter kAPnnen den "ersten Faktor" stA$?rken, sodass der physische Besitz
des Sticks weniger relevant fA1/4r das Erreichen des angestrebten
Sicherheitsniveaus ist. Das Sperren von Nutzerzertifikaten an zentralen Punkten
(VPN-Konzentratoren, Terminal-Server oder internen Webseiten) ist einem
Einziehen des SBS als SicherheitsmaAnahme vorzuziehen.

6. SBS kann in virtueller Maschine verwendet werden

ErklA$?rung des Herstellers: "Vor AusfA1/4hrung der Firmware erfolgt eine PrA1/4fung, ob
der Stick in einer virtuellen Maschine gebootet wurde. Dies verhindert, dass die
SchutzmaAnahmen des Sticks unterlaufen werden und beispielsweise ein Keylogger
oder Trojaner auf dem Hostsystem Bildschirminhalte oder TastaturanschlA$?ge
protokolliert."

Die Entwicklung guter Erkennungsstrategien einerseits und die Verbesserung von
VMs zur Vermeidung einer solchen Erkennung andererseits ist ein fortwA$?hrender
Wettlauf -- unter anderem zwischen Virenautoren und Antivirusherstellen. Aus
theoretischer Sicht ist eine Erkennung einer virtualisierten Umgebung nicht
unter allen UmstA$?nden zu garantieren. Allerdings kann es aus praktischer Sicht
vergleichsweise schwierig sein eine solche Virtualisierungsumgebung zu
implementieren (siehe z.B. [4]).

Dies fA1/4hrt zur Frage wie sich die SchutzmaAnahmen des SBS in diesem
Spannungsfeld einordnen. Fehlermeldungen wA$?hrend des Bootvorgangs deuten darauf
hin, dass die Erkennung ein Teil der kryptographischen Schutzmechanismen ist.
Zeichenketten in der verantwortlichen Executable zeigen verblA1/4ffende
Ahnlichkeiten zur Virtualisierungserkennung von systemd (der GPL-Code kann im
https://github.com/systemd/systemd/blob/master/src/basic/virt.c) eingesehen
werden. Allerdings wurde die Erkennung von systemd nie entwickelt, um gegen
bAPsartige Angriffe zu bestehen, so dass es nicht A1/4berrascht, dass ein
unmodifiziertes KVM einfach instruiert werden kann einen SBS in einer VM zu
booten. Es genA1/4gt folgendes Kommando:

kvm -m 2048 \
-cpu host,kvm=off,-hypervisor \
-usb -device usb-ehci,id=ehci \
-device usb-host,bus=ehci.0,vendorid=0x8564,productid=0x1000 \
-smbios 'type=0,vendor=' -smbios 'type=1,manufacturer=,product='

Falls ein Angreifer keinen physischen Zugang zu einem Stick haben sollte,
sondern nur ein Image (beispielsweise von einem kompromittierten Rechner), kann
er durch einen simplen Patch von QEMU den gleichen Ansatz verwenden. Blaupausen
sind im https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/qemu-discuss/2015-07/msg00072.html.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/virtualization.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

Es existieren zwei Szenarien in denen die Schwachstelle zu einem erfolgreichen
Angriff fA1/4hren kann:

1. Ein legitimer Benutzer virtualisiert eigeninitiativ, etwa aus Bequemlichkeit
oder weil er ein Bildschirmfoto machen mAPchte. Gerade Letzteres sollte laut
Herstelleraussage unmAPglich sein: "Das Erstellen, Abspeichern, Drucken oder
Weiterleiten von Bildschirmkopien wird A1/4ber eine sichere ZugangslAPsung
verhindert."
2. Der Nutzer weiA nicht, dass sein System virtualisiert betrieben wird. Wie
bereits vor mehr als 10 Jahren demonstriert wurde, ist es bAPsartiger
Software mAPglich, dass eigentliche Betriebssystem in einer VM auszufA1/4hren,
um die eigene Anwesenheit zu verbergen [5]. Auch fA1/4r einen dediziert
gebooteten SBS sind verschiedene nutzertransparente Virtualisierungsangriffe
denkbar. Beispiele sind:

- Ein kompromittiertes Betriebssystem verA$?ndert im UEFI NVRAM die
Bootreihenfolge (offizielle API-Funktion). Es stellt auf diese Weise
sicher, dass das Booten vom USB-Stick deaktiviert wird. Falls beim
Booten ein Ecos-Stick detektiert wird, fA$?hrt es den Stick in einer
VM hoch.
- Ein kompromittiertes Betriebssystem rebootet den PC nicht nach
Nutzeranweisung. Stattdessen wird ein kurzes Video mit BIOS-Ausgaben
gezeigt und der SBS in einer virtuellen Maschine gestartet.
- Eine bAPsartige Software modifiziert den SBS, sodass er immer in einer VM
bootet (siehe Schwachstelle 10, warum dies mAPglich ist).

Ein virtualisiertes Ecos-SBS-System kann jederzeit vollstA$?ndig A1/4berwacht und
modifiziert werden. Das bedeutet ein Angreifer ist in der Lage:

- Nutzerverhalten, Sitzung-, LangzeitschlA1/4ssel, PINs und PasswAPrter
aufzuzeichnen. Das heiAt der Angreifer kontrolliert _beide_ Teile
der Zweifaktorauthentisierung.
- Er kann laufende Programme, das SBS-Betriebssystem und involvierte
Daten verA$?ndern.
- Alle extrahierten Daten kAPnnen unter Umgehung der SBS-eigenen Firewall A1/4ber
das Netzwerk versendet werden, sodass ein Angreifer keinen physischen
Zugang benAPtigt.

Zusammenfassend kAPnnen keinerlei Sicherheitsziele garantiert werden, falls
Virtualisierungsangriffe nicht effektiv verhindert werden kAPnnen.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Nutzer dA1/4rfen den SBS nicht in GerA$?te einstecken, die
unvertrauenswA1/4rdige Hard- oder Software enthalten kAPnnten. Administratoren
mA1/4ssen sich bewusst sein, dass Nutzer Virtualisierung verwenden, um ihre Sticks
zu betreiben. Falls den Nutzern nicht vollstA$?ndig vertraut werden kann, kann der
SBS nicht sicher eingesetzt werden.

7. SBS ist anfA$?llig fA1/4r HintertA1/4ren in Firmwares der Hardware

Der Hersteller erklA$?rt: "ZusA$?tzlich A1/4bernimmt das ECOS SECURE LINUX die Hoheit
A1/4ber die angeschlossene Peripherie, so dass selbst eine Schadsoftware im BIOS
oder im UEFI keine Bedrohung darstellt."

Diese Aussage ist recht A1/4berraschend, denn sie widerspricht:

- FrA1/4heren und aktuellen Aussagen der Forschungsgemeinschaft (siehe [6] oder
[7])
- Der Ansicht eines angesehenen Anonymisierungsprojektes, welches ebenfalls
auf ein sicheres Bootmedium setzt
(Tails: https://tails.boum.org/doc/about/warning/index.en.html)
- Aussagen von Intel (z.B.
https://firmware.intel.com/sites/default/files/STM_User_Guide-001.pdf)

Um die Herstelleraussage zu validieren, wurde eine freiverfA1/4gbare UEFI-HintertA1/4r
von https://github.com/Cr4sh/SmmBackdoor leicht modifiziert. So wurde
beispielsweise eine einfache Speicherersetzungsstrategie implementiert, die es
erlaubt IPsec-SitzungsschlA1/4ssel auf portable Art und Weise zu extrahieren und
A1/4ber das Internet zu versenden. Das Resultat ist ein circa 600 Zeilen C-Code
umfassendes EFI-Modul, welchen in einem MSI Z170A GAMING M7 Motherboard
installiert wurde. Dazu genA1/4gt das AusfA1/4hren einer Datei mit einem
Administrator-Account in einer unmodifizierten Windows-Installation. DafA1/4r wurde
ein aktuelles UEFI von der offiziellen MSI-Webseite bezogen, mittels eines
https://github.com/LongSoft/UEFITool modifiziert und anschlieAend mit dem
offiziellen MSI BIOS Upgrade Tool aufgespielt. Der Ansatz ist hochgradig
flexibel, da das verA$?nderte UEFI beispielsweise A1/4ber gezielte Mails oder einen
https://hakshop.com/products/usb-rubber-ducky-deluxe) (siehe Video injiziert
werden kann.

Wie zu erwarten, kann der Ecos SBS die Extraktion des SchlA1/4sselmaterials nicht
verhindern. Ein Angreifer ist in der Lage, IPsec-SchlA1/4ssel auszuleiten und eine
gekapselte RDP-Session in Echtzeit abzuhAPren.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/smmBackdoor.mp4

Durch Speichermanipulationen ist es ebenfalls mAPglich, Programmcode im SBS zur
Laufzeit zu verA$?ndern. Zur Demonstration wurde der login-Prozess verA$?ndert,
sodass er eine Root-Shell APffnet. Andere VerA$?nderungen sind selbstverstA$?ndlich
ebenfalls mAPglich.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/loginPatch.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Eine manipulierte PC-Firmware kann jegliche laufenden Betriebssysteme,
Programme und Nutzerdaten in Echtzeit verA$?ndern ohne dass dies durch eine
Software festgestellt werden kann.
- Es kAPnnen Daten, wie Sitzungs-, LangzeitschlA1/4ssel, PasswAPrter und PINs aus
Haupt- und Massenspeichern gelesen werden.
- Jegliche Art einer lokalen Firewall kann umgangen werden, um Informationen
A1/4ber das Netz zu senden.

Zusammenfassend kAPnnen keinerlei Sicherheitsziele garantiert werden, falls die
Firmware einer Hardware kompromittiert wurde auf der ein SBS ausgefA1/4hrt wird.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Nutzer dA1/4rfen den SBS nicht in GerA$?te einstecken, die
unvertrauenswA1/4rdige Hard- oder Software enthalten kAPnnten.

8. Konstruktion der Trust-Chain adressiert Problemstellung ungenA1/4gend

Ecos bewirbt die UEFI-Secure-Boot-UnterstA1/4tzung als ein Sicherheitsmerkmal.
Weiterhin geben sie an: "In einer A>>Chain-of TrustA<< A1/4berprA1/4fen sich Bootloader,
Kernel und Applikationen gegenseitig durch einen sich permanent wiederholenden
Prozess."

Bereits die vorhergehenden zwei Schwachstellen unterstreichen, dass nicht die
BIOS/UEFI-Komponente die IntegritA$?t und AuthentizitA$?t des gestarteten
Betriebssystems verifizieren muss, sondern dass das Betriebssystem in der Lage
sein mA1/4sste zu verifizieren, dass es in einer authentischen Umgebung gestartet
wurde. Dieses Sicherheitsmerkmal wird durch UEFI-Secure-Boot schlicht nicht
realisiert. Ecos hat signifikanten Aufwand betrieben, um eine vom UEFI
ausgehende eine "Top-Down"-Verifikation zu realisieren, allerdings kann ein
Angreifer die AberprA1/4fungen einfach entfernen oder die Komponenten ersetzen, zum
Beispiel einen Vanilla-Kernel oder einen eigenen Bootloader. UEFI-Secure-Boot
kann den Start eines so modifizierten Sticks nur unter folgenden UmstA$?nden
garantiert verhindern:

- Das UEFI und anderen Hardware-Komponenten sind nicht kompromittiert (siehe
vorhergehende Schwachstelle)
- Der Hersteller hat die Hoheit A1/4ber alle in den GerA$?ten installierten
UEFI-SchlA1/4ssel und stellt sicher, dass nur der eigene Bootloader startet.
Aktuell hat Microsoft die Hoheit A1/4ber diese SchlA1/4ssel und erlaubt auch die
Signatur von Bootloadern dritter Parteien. Ferner unterlaufen auch Microsoft
sicherheitskritische Fehler
(siehe https://www.heise.de/security/meldung/Kardinalfehler-Microsoft-setzt-aus-Versehen-Secure-Boot-schachmatt-3291946.html).
- Der USB-Stick (oder eine andere vertrauenswA1/4rdige Instanz) verhindert das
Booten der Umgebung, falls die Hardware nicht A1/4ber einen UEFI-Secure-Boot
unter den obigen Bedingungen verfA1/4gt.

Die letzte Bedingung impliziert, dass der Stick auf eine geeignete Art seine
Umgebung verifizieren muss. Der Stick verifiziert allerdings aktuell nur den
gestarteten Kernel (weder das BIOS/UEFI noch den tatsA$?chlich aktiven
Bootloader). Auch diese Authentisierung geschieht nur an zwei Stellen; wir
werden uns im Folgenden auf die ausgeklA1/4geltere konzentrieren. Hierbei geht der
gestartete Kernel in den Prozess zur EntschlA1/4sselung des SBS-Dateisystems mit
ein. Ein tatsA$?chliches Ausnutzen der ungenA1/4genden vom UEFI-ausgehenden
Vertrauenskette wird im Rahmen von Schwachstelle 10 vorgestellt.

Um SchlA1/4sselmaterial abzuleiten, mit dem auf die verschlA1/4sselten Teile des SBS
zugegriffen werden kann, misst der initiale Userland-Prozess (das A!nit-Programm
aus dem initrd-Image auf Partition 4) den Kernel, den Stick selbst und die
aktiven Userland-Prozesse. Der Bootprozess beendet sich mit einem
"EntschlA1/4sselungsfehler", wenn Anderungen detektiert werden. Das heiAt
Modifikationen an der Bootkette, z.B. durch vorheriges Starten eines Programms,
A$?ndern die Messung und Modifikationen an spA$?ter aktivierten Komponenten
scheitern, da diese Teile verschlA1/4sselt und authentisiert sind. Ein Angreifer
kAPnnte den Maschinencode der involvierten Executables analysieren, aber es
existiert ein weit bequemerer und flexiblerer Weg: Fortschritte bei der
Entwicklung von Sandboxing-Umgebungen kAPnnen genutzt werden, den Prozess der
SchlA1/4sselgenerierung kontrolliert auszufA1/4hren. Beispielsweise kann
https://usercorn.party verwendet werden, um alle Syscalls abzufangen,
gegebenenfalls zu modifizieren oder zu unterdrA1/4cken. Unter Nutzung dieser
Technik kann exakt kontrolliert werden, welche Informationen der Prozess erhA$?lt
und welche verborgen bleiben sollen. Zum Beispiel kann der SignaturprA1/4fung
einfach ein anderes Image gegeben werden, als das welches spA$?ter eingebunden
wird. Falls der Nutzer kein Bootpasswort gesetzt hat, kAPnnen auf diese Weise
direkt alle Geheimnisse, die im SBS gespeichert sind, extrahiert werden.

Um ein vorzeitiges Abbrechen der Emulation zu verhindern, mA1/4ssen weitere
Syscalls in usercorn abgefangen werden. Dabei ist es jedoch hinreichend dem
aufrufenden Prozess eine erfolgreiche AusfA1/4hrung durch einen geeigneten
RA1/4ckgabewert zu signalisieren. Eine eigentliche Implementation der Syscalls ist
nicht erforderlich.

Die Verwendung von usercorn ist allerdings nicht die einzige MAPglichkeit den
Kontrollfluss bei der SchlA1/4sselgenerierung zu steuern. Zumindest die folgenden
fA1/4nf AnsA$?tze sind denkbar:

1. Die Argumente, die der init-Prozess dem Linux-Kernel A1/4bergibt, kAPnnten in
einem modifzierten Linux-Kernel vor der AusfA1/4hrung geA$?ndert werden.
Beispielsweise kAPnnte der gestartete Prozess geeignet markiert werden, und
beim Lesen von Dateien wie /proc/keys einfach den Inhalt einer anderen
Datei erhalten.
2. Syscall-Argumente kAPnnen auch zur Laufzeit durch ptrace und seccomp
verA$?ndert werden (https://github.com/alfonsosanchezbeato/ptrace-redirect).
3. Die init-Datei kann in einem Debugger gestartet und Breakpoints bei jeder
int 80h-Instruktion (Syscall) gesetzt werden. Beim Anspringen der
Breakpoints kAPnnen anschlieAend die Argumente der Syscalls vor jeder
AusfA1/4hrung verA$?ndert werden.
4. Eine String-Analyse des init-Programms legt die starke Vermutung nahe, dass
es GPL-lizensierten Programm-Code enthA$?lt, wodurch das komplette Programm
dieser Lizenz unterliegen wA1/4rde. Der Hersteller wA$?re in diesem Fall
verpflichtet, jedem Nutzer den vollstA$?ndigen Programm-Code zugA$?nglich zu
machen, den dieser modifizieren und weitergeben kAPnnte. Ein Angreifer kAPnnte
mittels des auf diese Weise beschafften Codes ein eigenes, beliebig
modifiziertes init-Programm erzeugen.
5. Es ist mAPglich, spezifische Teile der init-Binary durch Analyse und
VerA$?nderung des Maschinencodes in ihrem Verhalten zu modifizieren.
Beispielsweise kAPnnen SignaturprA1/4fungen A1/4bersprungen oder Dateizugriffe
umgeleitet werden.

_Video:_
https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/offlineKeyExtraction.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Falls kein Bootpasswort gesetzt wurde, kann ein Angreifer die gesamte
Nutzerkonfiguration einsehen, inklusive der privaten SchlA1/4ssel.
- Falls ein Bootpasswort gesetzt wurde, kann ein Angreifer PasswAPrter durch
die Emulation automatisch durchprobieren lassen. Falls das Bootpasswort
nicht ausreichend Entropie besitzt kAPnnen die gleichen Daten
extrahiert werden.
- In jedem Fall kann der stick-spezifische Teil der Konfiguration und die
"Firmware" des Sticks ausgelesen werden, ohne den SBS zu booten. Dies ist
eine Voraussetzung fA1/4r das Ausnutzen der folgenden Schwachstellen.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_

Die Folgenden drei MaAnahmen wirken nur in Kombination:

- Die BootpasswAPrter dA1/4rfen nicht fA1/4r Bruteforce-Angriffe empfA$?nglich sein.
- Die Nutzer mA1/4ssen sicherstellen, dass sie tatsA$?chlich von einem angesteckten
Stick booten (PC abschalten, wieder anschalten im BIOS die Bootreihenfolge
A1/4berprA1/4fen), da ein kompromittiertes Betriebssystem die SBS-Umgebung einfach
vortA$?uschen kAPnnte. Dabei kAPnnte es auch das Bootpasswort abfragen, indem
der initiale Prozess in einer Sandbox ausgefA1/4hrt wird.
- Es dA1/4rfen ausschlieAlich USB-Sticks mit einem hardware-seitigen
Schreibschutz genutzt werden (Details folgen in Schwachstelle 10). Der
Schreibmodus darf lediglich in vollstA$?ndig vertrauenswA1/4rdigen Umgebungen
aktiviert werden.

9. Aktivierter SSH-Zugang fA1/4r vorkonfigurierten root-Nutzer im Ecos SBS

Unter Nutzung der EntschlA1/4sselungsmethode ist es nicht nur mAPglich, das
sogenannte "Firmware"-Image und die nutzerspezifische Konfiguration zu
extrahieren, sondern es findet sich auch eine weitere Konfiguration im
Verzeichnis basedata/certs der vierten Partition, die fA1/4r alle unterschiedlichen
Bootmethoden gleich ist. Diese Konfiguration ist nicht durch das Bootpasswort
geschA1/4tzt und kann daher in jedem Fall extrahiert werden. Das Verzeichnis
enthA$?lt unter anderem eine verschlA1/4sselte und signierte shadow Datei. Im
untersuchten Stick hatte sie den folgenden Inhalt:

root:$6$kD.Sv/YPnhZqNwXw$xHvghwrKESSS4inwjPRFt5UNgsLXRuuCtUUIP1.W7qK08NkBF.n/vT7iRpSH4hLB2aZ8iPtuNQ20mlVoEaNgk1:10091:0:99999:7:::
setup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
remotesetup:*:12101:0:99999:7:::
RUNPUyBUZWNobm9sb2d5IEdtYkg6IGNvbmYtc2lnbtlpePrdaFQhGVMzvKCum1Se8f8kAQAytCKRbYYaeiWywek18P0AAJ43Yhy/VUvpMUBdRom8Wd/WISBXe23ZqumopgwNDglYvcSm28AK+tufQxcX8P4MspVLuI07CH9CGLmPqgzffP0gqpPFbSsEGtBiCX/9h5epu7ARnGfKst/2uWLLSvXidcKqht2A6f38QxNO7MGxrKZ5wDOkqTnJx3nxjKFfN5Rpmlyz7gLo8s+VscAPqf6if8QzH6rksRHRAKFzPGcCtVKExNA5dxURNFGU10NUtuZUE5ZbawLSfhbxNenLBf3bAMLdKNxIPVZsJhPUEvHJntyK73Dype5o3JXiLmiPo/GSXmp31NCl50cAyvNFyIYpAQYBHxQAAAAAAAECfk1vZHVsZSBzaWduYXR1cmUgYXBwZW5kZWR+Cg==

Die base64-kodierte Signatur verweist auf Ecos, wurde also nicht durch die
Management Appliance generiert. Weiterhin ist die shadow-Datei bereits
werksseitig auf Sticks vorhanden, die noch nicht initialisiert wurden, also auch
noch keinen Kontakt zum Management des Kunden hatten. Dies weist auf einen
weiteren undokumentierten root-Zugang hin. Im Unterschied zu Schwachstelle 1
allerdings nicht in der Management Appliance, sondern direkt auf den Sticks
selbst. Dass es sich tatsA$?chlich um einen Zugang handelt, der vom Hersteller
auch A1/4ber SSH genutzt werden kAPnnte, wird im Zuge der nA$?chsten Schwachstelle
demonstriert.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/sbsRootAccess.mp4

_Potentielle Implikationen:_

- Der Hersteller hat die MAPglichkeit den root-Nutzer als HintertA1/4r zu nutzen
und sich in einen SBS einzuloggen, wenn dieser aktiv ist.
- Der Hersteller kann auf Dateien auf der privaten Festplatte des
Nutzers zugreifen. Ecos behauptet zwar: "Schutz vor Zugriff auf private
Fotos und E-Mails". Allerdings enthA$?lt das "gehA$?rtete" Linux-Betriebssystem
des SBS sogar einen NTFS-Dateisystem-Treiber, der A1/4ber SSH genutzt
werden kann.
- Der Hersteller kann vertrauliche Konfigurationsparameter, wie private
SchlA1/4ssel und PasswAPrter, einsehen.
- Der Hersteller kann die Konfiguration des Sticks verA$?ndern, z.B. auf ein
unsicheres VerschlA1/4sselungsschema wechseln.
- Falls der Hersteller jemals selbst von einem Sicherheitsproblem betroffen
sein sollte, beispielsweise durch einen gekA1/4ndigten Mitarbeiter oder eine
Software-Schwachstelle, kAPnnten weitere Parteien das Passwort erhalten.
- Falls dasselbe Passwort fA1/4r alle Kunden verwendet wird:
- Ein Angreifer kAPnnte durch einen Brute-Force-Angriff Kenntnis des
Passworts erhalten und Zugriff auf andere Installationen erhalten.
- Falls das Passwort je verwendet werden sollte, kAPnnte es durch einen
Man-in-the-Middle-Angriff in die HA$?nde eines Angreifers gelangen, der es
fA1/4r eigene Zwecke missbrauchen kann.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_ Der SBS darf nicht in Szenarien eingesetzt werden in
denen ein Zugriff auf den SSH-Dienst mAPglich ist.

10. Daten des SBS kAPnnen bAPsartig verA$?ndert werden

Herstelleraussage: "SchreibgeschA1/4tzte Partition fA1/4r Firmware und Applikationen"

Technisch sauberer ist die Aussage, dass unautorisierte Modifikationen am Stick
-- etwa durch SignaturA1/4berprA1/4fungen -- erkannt werden. Allerdings ist auch diese
relaxierte Aussage nicht in jedem Fall aufrecht zu erhalten, wie anhand der
folgenden drei Szenarien diskutiert wird.

VollstA$?ndiges Aberschreiben des SBS

Der SBS ist hardware-seitig ein vAPllig gewAPhnliches USB-Speichermedium. Ein
kompromittiertes Betriebssystem kAPnnte den Inhalt des gesamten Stick also
vollstA$?ndig A1/4berschreiben, wenn der Nutzer den Stick einsteckt wA$?hrend das OS
noch aktiv ist. Beispielsweise kAPnnte es ein minimales OS auf dem Stick
platzieren, welches nach dem Booten sofort alle Massenspeicher absucht und
darauf vorhandene Betriebssysteme infiziert. Danach kAPnnte es ein Ecos Logo mit
der Fehlermeldung "Ihr PC wird nicht unterstA1/4tzt, bitte verwenden Sie den SBS in
einem anderen PC" zeigen.

Dieser Ansatz kAPnnte es einem Angreifer erlauben, Malware von einem
Heimarbeitsplatz auf einen PC innerhalb eines Firmennetzes zu verbreiten.

Missbrauch des root-Nutzers

Wie bereits erwA$?hnt ist zwar die sogenannte "Firmware", also die eigentliche
Arbeitsumgebung des SBS, durch eine Signatur geschA1/4tzt, die Stick-Konfiguration
jedoch nur A1/4ber einen von auAen zu berechnenden symmetrischen
Authentisierungswert. Das bedeutet, dass das SchlA1/4sselmaterial welches zur
EntschlA1/4sselung verwendet wurde (siehe Punkt 8) auch dazu verwendet werden kann
die Konfiguration zu verA$?ndern; mAPglicherweise ohne dass diese Modifikation
erkannt wird. Die Stick-Konfiguration kann dabei selbst dann verA$?ndert werden,
wenn das Bootpasswort _nicht_ bekannt ist. Das bedeutet, die im Rahmen der
letzten Schwachstelle beschriebene shadow-Datei kann verA$?ndert und so ein
eigenes root-Passwort gesetzt werden. Eine HA1/4rde ist noch zu nehmen: Der
Angreifer muss die historische crypt-Methode benutzen, um den Hash des
root-Passworts zu generieren und sicherstellen, dass eine update.conf-Datei im
gleichen Verzeichnis existiert. Diese scheint nur auf manchen Sticks prA$?sent zu
sein und enthA$?lt die folgenden Daten:

reltype=V5.6.5
bbtype=mthc
fn1=ca.crt
fn2=base.pem
fn3=runtime.pem
fn4=shadow
fn5=my.pem

force-reltype=1

Nach dieser Modifikation kann ein Angreifer A1/4ber SSH auf den SBS zugreifen,
unabhA$?ngig davon auf welchem Computer dieser gebootet wurde (sofern
SSH-Netzwerkzugriff gegeben ist). Aber die SSH-Sitzung kAPnnen
Langzeitgeheimnisse, SitzungsschlA1/4ssel und Daten von der privaten Festplatte des
Nutzers abgegriffen werden (der SBS enthA$?lt hierzu bereits einen
NTFS-Dateisystem-Treiber). Zum Teil kAPnnen diese auch modifiziert werden.
AuAerdem enthA$?lt das "gehA$?rtete" Betriebssystem auch ein Werkzeug um Screenshots
von der aktiven Nutzersitzung zu machen (/bin/xwd) und einen funktionsfA$?higen
VNC-Server, sodass es mAPglich ist den Nutzer live zu beobachten oder sogar mit
der Sitzung zu interagieren. Passives Beobachten wird dem SBS-Nutzer gegenA1/4ber
nicht angezeigt (falls der Angreifer dies nicht explizit mAPchte).

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickMod1.mp4

Selektives Modifizieren ausfA1/4hrbarer Dateien auf dem SBS

Auch ohne Ausnutzen des schwach geschA1/4tzten Teils der Konfiguration ist es
mAPglich den Stick auf geschickte Art zu modifizieren. So ist es mAPglich
SignaturA1/4berprA1/4fungen vollstA$?ndig zu entfernen und den Stick mit einer HintertA1/4r
zu versehen, die beispielsweise andere Betriebssysteme infiziert und den SBS als
Wirt benutzt. Dazu kAPnnen die initialen SignaturA1/4berprA1/4fungen durch einen
eigenen Bootloader (mit Ecos-Theme) und Kernel ausgehebelt werden. Durch einen
modifizierten Kontrollfluss wA$?hrend des init-Prozesses, fA$?llt dies, ebenso wie
eine VerA$?nderung des squashfs-Dateisystems, nicht auf. Im Rahmen von
Schwachstelle 8 wurden verschiedene Wege beschrieben mit denen eine solche
VerA$?nderung des Kontrollflusses erreicht werden kann.

Es verbleiben die AberprA1/4fungen der geladenen Betriebssystemumgebung. Ecos
beschreibt: "Wird eine Manipulation erkannt, schaltet sich der Stick sofort ab.
Eine Manipulation des Sticks, egal ob im laufenden Betrieb oder im
ausgeschalteten Zustand, wird so wirkungsvoll verhindert." Allerdings ist es
relativ schwierig diese SicherheitsA1/4berprA1/4fung A1/4berhaupt auszulAPsen, da sie auf
einer (sehr kleinen) Whitelist zu basieren scheint. Von den 663 Dateien im
/bin-Verzeichnis des "gehA$?rteten" Betriebssystems scheint dies nur auf eine
Handvoll zuzutreffen. Es ist daher sehr einfach diesen Schutzmechanismus zu
umgehen. FA1/4r Demonstrationszwecke wurde das Werkzeug /bin/insmod im Ecos-OS
ausgetauscht, um eine Windows-Installation zu infizieren. Die Datei wird
regelmA$?Aig ausgefA1/4hrt und ist nicht durch die Whitelist geschA1/4tzt.

_Video:_ https://telematik.prakinf.tu-ilmenau.de/ecos-sbs/stickMod2.mp4

Diskussion bAPsartiger VerA$?nderungen

_Potentielle Implikationen:_ Die Auswirkungen dieser Schwachstelle hA$?ngen stark
vom Angriffsszenario und den Ressourcen des Angreifers ab. Hauptbedrohungen
sind:

- Der Angreifer kann den SBS nutzen, um Malware von Host zu Host
zu A1/4bertragen. MAPglicherweise kAPnnten so weitere SBS infiziert werden.
- Der Angreifer kann Daten vom privaten Massenspeicher des PCs sowie
Konfigurationsparameter, PasswAPrter und private SchlA1/4ssel vom SBS auslesen
(ohne ein mAPglicherweise starkes Bootpasswort zu kennen).
- Der Angreifer kann den init-Prozess verA$?ndern, sodass das Bootpasswort oder
die Smartcard PIN aufgezeichnet werden (falls er diese an anderer
Stelle benAPtigt).
- Falls eine Smartcard genutzt wird, kann ein Angreifer diese nutzen solange
der SBS aktiv ist.
- Der Angreifer kann jegliche SBS-interne Firewall abschalten.
- Der Angreifer kann selbststA$?ndig eine Kommunikation initiieren, etwa zu
einem zentralen Command-and-Control-Server.
- In AbhA$?ngigkeit von den FA$?higkeiten des Angreifers kAPnnen alle aufgezA$?hlten
Angriffe verdeckt ablaufen, das heiAt der Nutzer ist nicht in der Lage diese
zu erkennen, da funktionale Aspekte des SBS weiterhin gewA$?hrleistet sind.

_MAPgliche GegenmaAnahmen:_

Nutzer dA1/4rfen den SBS nicht in GerA$?te einstecken, die unvertrauenswA1/4rdige Hard-
oder Software enthalten kAPnnten. SBS sollten nicht an unterschiedlichen PCs
verwendet werden, um ein etwaiges Verbreiten von Malware zu unterbinden.


3. Zusammenfassung

In diesem Dokument wurden verschiedene Schwachstellen des Ecos SBS und seiner
Management Plattform diskutiert. Die Sicherheitsanalyse hat sich dabei auf den
Bootprozess und das Easy Enrollment fokussiert. Nichtsdestoweniger zeigen die
Resultate, dass eine Reihe von Sicherheitsaussagen der Herstellerwebseite und
BroschA1/4ren zumindest aktuell nicht zu halten sind. Dies umfasst:

- "Die Nutzung des Sticks hinterlA$?sst keinerlei Spuren, womit es
ausgeschlossen ist RA1/4ckschlA1/4sse auf Verbindungsdaten oder Arbeitsdaten zu
nehmen.", Schwachstelle 4
- "Zertifikat, gekoppelt an die Hardware-ID des Sticks", Schwachstelle 5
- "Vor AusfA1/4hrung der Firmware erfolgt eine PrA1/4fung, ob der Stick in einer
virtuellen Maschine gebootet wurde. Dies verhindert, dass die
SchutzmaAnahmen des Sticks unterlaufen werden und beispielsweise ein
Keylogger oder Trojaner auf dem Hostsystem Bildschirminhalte oder
TastaturanschlA$?ge protokolliert.", Schwachstelle 6
- "Das Erstellen, Abspeichern, Drucken oder Weiterleiten von Bildschirmkopien
wird A1/4ber eine sichere ZugangslAPsung verhindert.", Schwachstellen 6 und 9
- "ZusA$?tzlich A1/4bernimmt das ECOS SECURE LINUX die Hoheit A1/4ber die
angeschlossene Peripherie, so dass selbst eine Schadsoftware im BIOS oder im
UEFI keine Bedrohung darstellt.", Schwachstelle 7
- "In einer A>>Chain-of TrustA<< A1/4berprA1/4fen sich Bootloader, Kernel und
Applikationen gegenseitig durch einen sich permanent wiederholenden
Prozess.", Schwachstelle 8 und 10
- "Schutz vor Zugriff auf private Fotos und E-Mails", Schwachstelle 9 und 10
- "SchreibgeschA1/4tzte Partition fA1/4r Firmware und Applikationen", Schwachstelle
10
- "Wird eine Manipulation erkannt, schaltet sich der Stick sofort ab. Eine
Manipulation des Sticks, egal ob im laufenden Betrieb oder im
ausgeschalteten Zustand, wird so wirkungsvoll verhindert.", Schwachstelle 10

AuAerdem, wurden mAPgliche HerstellerhintertA1/4ren, eine Schwachstelle gegen
Man-in-the-Middle-Angriffe und die MAPglichkeit aufgedeckt, die interne
Management-Datenbank auszulesen, inklusive aller privaten SchlA1/4ssel assoziierter
SBS.

Einige dieser Schwachstellen mAPgen auf einfache NachlA$?ssigkeiten zurA1/4ckzufA1/4hren
sein, etwa die aktivierten root-Nutzer oder die MAPglichkeit die Datenbank zu
spiegeln. Ein groAer Anteil basiert jedoch auf konzeptionellen Fehlern. Von
diesen kAPnnten Schwachstelle 5 durch die korrekte Nutzung mit einer Smartcard
abgewendet werden. Die Kernprobleme von Schwachstellen 4, 6, 7 & 8 liegen jedoch
in Limitierungen der aktuellen x86-Plattform. Sie kAPnnen nach Meinung der
Autoren nicht ohne zusA$?tzliche hardware-seitige FA$?higkeiten oder die
ausschlieAliche und exklusive Nutzung vertrauenswA1/4rdiger Hardware behoben
werden.

Aus makroskopischer Sicht sind die beschriebenen Schwachstellen ebenfalls
interessant, da sie zeigen wie wenig verlA$?sslich punktuelle IT-Sicherheitstest
bei EinfA1/4hrung eines Produktes sind. Die meisten Referenzkunden, die von Ecos
angefA1/4hrt werden, gaben an, dass sie interne oder externe Sicherheitstests
durchgefA1/4hrt haben. Die Empfehlungen implizieren, dass dabei keinerlei
schwerwiegende Fragen bezA1/4glich der Sicherheit aufgekommen sind.

Die Analyse unsererseits erstreckte sich A1/4ber einen Zeitraum von ungefA$?hr einem
Monat und wurde neben unseren eigentlichen Forschungsprojekten durchgefA1/4hrt.
Professionelle Pentester werden vermutlich weniger Zeitressourcen haben, sodass
sie die verschiedenen kryptographischen Verschleierungsschichten nicht
durchdringen kAPnnen. Selbst unser weniger beschrA$?nkter Zeitplan erlaubte keine
vollstA$?ndige AberprA1/4fung aller Angriffsvektoren, die der SBS durch seinen Ansatz
bietet. Dennoch ist es alarmierend, dass einige Herstelleraussage direkt der
verbreiteten Meinung von Sicherheitsexperten widersprechen -- offensichtlich
ohne signifikante Zweifel zu wecken. Am markantesten sind die folgenden Punkte:

- Die Erkennung einer virtualisierten Umgebung kann nicht garantiert werden.
- Firmwares (EFI aber auch Intel ME und weitere) in aktueller x86-Hardware
dA1/4rfen nicht als sicher angenommen werden.
- USB-GerA$?ten darf nur unter sehr strenge Auflagen vertraut werden ([8]
enthA$?lt einen weiteren Angriffsvektor).

Selbst der einfache BSI IT-Grundschutz enthA$?lt in Abschnitt M 4.63 die
Anforderung "Der Telearbeitsrechner sollte A1/4ber einen Boot-Schutz verfA1/4gen, um
zu verhindern, dass unbefugt von auswechselbaren DatentrA$?gern, z.B. von DVD oder
USB-Stick, gebootet werden kann." Es existieren jedoch keine
Hardware-Mechanismen, die zusichern kAPnnten, dass nur authentische Sticks
gebootet werden kAPnnen. Dennoch behauptet Ecos zu M4.63 konform zu sein.


4. Autoren

Die Schwachstellen wurden von Robert Lasch, Franz Girlich und Michael Rossberg
(ohne bestimmte Reihenfolge) gefunden und mit Demonstrationen unterlegt.
Wissenschaftliche Aufsicht fA1/4hrte Guenter Schaefer[1].

Fragen und Anmerkungen kAPnnen an Michael Rossberg via michael [dot] rossberg
[at] tu [dash] ilmenau [dot] de gerichtet werden. Der korrespondierende
GPG-Fingerprint lautet: FD9B 425C 8DE5 69D6 77ED 52C2 CC00 C314 0337 76C9


5. Ablauf der VerAPffentlichung

- 13. April 2018 - Hersteller informiert
- 30. April 2018 - BSI lA$?sst [SX] und [SE] Varianten des Sticks zur
Verarbeitung von VS-NfD-Daten zu
- 13. Juni 2018 - VerAPffentlichung


6. Referenzen

[1] J. Bauer, M. Gruhn, und F. C. Freiling, aLest we forget: Cold-boot attacks
on scrambled DDR3 memorya, _Digital Investigation_, Bd. 16, S. S65aS74, 2016.

[2] S. F. Yitbarek, M. T. Aga, R. Das, und T. Austin, aCold boot attacks are
still hot: Security analysis of memory scramblers in modern processorsa, in
_High performance computer architecture (HPCA), 2017 IEEE international
symposium on_, 2017, S. 313a324.

[3] G. Ravago, aReverse engineering a USB flash drivea. 2015.

[4] A. Sergeev, V. Minchenkov, und V. Bashun, aMalicious hypervisor and hidden
virtualization of operation systemsa, in _Application of information and
communication technologies (AICT), 2015 9th international conference on_, 2015,
S. 178a182.

[5] J. Rutkowska, aIntroducing blue pilla, _The official blog of the
invisiblethings.org_, Bd. 22, S. 23, 2006.

[6] S. Embleton und S. Sparks, aSMM rootkitsa, in _Proceedings of the 4th
International Conference on Security and Privacy in Communication Networks,
Securecomm_, 2008, Bd. 8.

[7] J. Rutkowska, aIntel x86 considered harmfula, _the Invisible Things Lab_,
2015.

[8] K. Nohl und J. Lell, aBadUSB a on accessories that turn evila, _Black Hat
USA_, 2014.

[1] TransparenzerklA$?rung: Guenter Schaefer arbeitet Vollzeit als Professor an
der Technischen UniversitA$?t Ilmenau. Weiterhin ist er nebenberuflich ein
Mitglied des Aufsichtsrats der secunet Security Networks AG.

Comments

RSS Feed Subscribe to this comment feed

No comments yet, be the first!

Login or Register to post a comment

File Archive:

November 2018

  • Su
  • Mo
  • Tu
  • We
  • Th
  • Fr
  • Sa
  • 1
    Nov 1st
    10 Files
  • 2
    Nov 2nd
    15 Files
  • 3
    Nov 3rd
    2 Files
  • 4
    Nov 4th
    2 Files
  • 5
    Nov 5th
    32 Files
  • 6
    Nov 6th
    27 Files
  • 7
    Nov 7th
    8 Files
  • 8
    Nov 8th
    9 Files
  • 9
    Nov 9th
    17 Files
  • 10
    Nov 10th
    2 Files
  • 11
    Nov 11th
    2 Files
  • 12
    Nov 12th
    33 Files
  • 13
    Nov 13th
    29 Files
  • 14
    Nov 14th
    23 Files
  • 15
    Nov 15th
    45 Files
  • 16
    Nov 16th
    11 Files
  • 17
    Nov 17th
    1 Files
  • 18
    Nov 18th
    1 Files
  • 19
    Nov 19th
    3 Files
  • 20
    Nov 20th
    2 Files
  • 21
    Nov 21st
    0 Files
  • 22
    Nov 22nd
    0 Files
  • 23
    Nov 23rd
    0 Files
  • 24
    Nov 24th
    0 Files
  • 25
    Nov 25th
    0 Files
  • 26
    Nov 26th
    0 Files
  • 27
    Nov 27th
    0 Files
  • 28
    Nov 28th
    0 Files
  • 29
    Nov 29th
    0 Files
  • 30
    Nov 30th
    0 Files

Top Authors In Last 30 Days

File Tags

Systems

packet storm

© 2018 Packet Storm. All rights reserved.

Services
Security Services
Hosting By
Rokasec
close